Privacy Policy

www.isotopic.co.uk

(GDPR) General Data Protection Regulation

Your Privacy: We only collect data that you consent to, and this data is provided through our email contact form. In compliance with GDPR, you can opt-in or opt-out and be forgotten about at any time. ISOTOPIC LTD endeavor to take all reasonable steps to protect your personal data.

The GDPR states that we must explain our privacy policy to you the (user) in an easily accessible form. It also must be concise, transparent and easy to understand. It also must be written in a clear and plain language. ISOTOPIC LTD feels that its privacy policy complies to these conditions and more.

For the purpose of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the 'data controller' is ISOTOPIC LTD. We may collect the following data:

  • Information that you provide by filling in the email form on our web site.
  • If you contact us, we may keep a record of that correspondence.
  • Details of IP visits to our site via AWSTATS.

Our Email Contact Form

Basic Information: When you send us an email using our email contact form, we only use the basic information to know more about you and your enquiry. This information is only used to return the email, and is never kept on any database, nor is it copied to any third party database. This basic information is archived in our internal email software and can be removed at any time by emailing the 'data controller' at ISOTOPIC LTD.

Spam Protection: Our email form is 'Captcha' configured. Captcha is an acronym for "Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart" Captcha is a type of challenge response test used in computing to determine whether or not the user is human. The test does not check the ability to give correct answers to questions, only how closely answers resemble those a human would give. In compliance with Spam, we use Captcha on our email form, it protects 'everyone' from Spam.

Cookies and Google Analytics

ISOTOPIC LTD do not use cookies or use Google Analytics for tracking visitors on this website.

What is the (GDPR) General Data Protection Regulation?

Brief overview: The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the most important change in data privacy regulation in 20 years.

Arguably the biggest change to the regulatory landscape of data privacy comes with the extended jurisdiction of the GDPR, as it applies to all companies processing the personal data of data subjects residing in the Union, regardless of the company’s location. Previously, territorial applicability of the directive was ambiguous and referred to data process 'in context of an establishment'. This topic has arisen in a number of high profile court cases. GPDR makes its applicability very clear - it will apply to the processing of personal data by controllers and processors in the EU, regardless of whether the processing takes place in the EU or not. The GDPR will also apply to the processing of personal data of data subjects in the EU by a controller or processor not established in the EU, where the activities relate to: offering goods or services to EU citizens (irrespective of whether payment is required) and the monitoring of behaviour that takes place within the EU. Non-Eu businesses processing the data of EU citizens will also have to appoint a representative in the EU.

Anyone who collects and processes personal data (defined by the GDPR as a Data Controller) will be required to comply with the new regulations to a certain degree. As well as organisations who run websites or apps, this also includes any organisations who use internal databases, CRMs or even just plain old email. Under the GPDR a data subject has the right to erasure of their data. This means that if an individual asks you to remove their data from your systems you have to comply. 

Consent: The conditions for consent have been strengthened, and companies will no longer be able to use long illegible terms and conditions full of legalese, as the request for consent must be given in an intelligible and easily accessible form, with the purpose for data processing attached to that consent. Consent must be clear and distinguishable from other matters and provided in an intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language. It must be as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give it.​

Privacy by design: Privacy by design as a concept has existed for years now, but it is only just becoming part of a legal requirement with the GDPR. At it’s core, privacy by design calls for the inclusion of data protection from the onset of the designing of systems, rather than an addition. More specifically - 'The controller shall..implement appropriate technical and organisational measures..in an effective way.. in order to meet the requirements of this Regulation and protect the rights of data subjects'. Article 23 calls for controllers to hold and process only the data absolutely necessary for the completion of its duties (data minimisation), as well as limiting the access to personal data to those needing to act out the processing

Right to be forgotten: Also known as Data Erasure, the right to be forgotten entitles the data subject to have the data controller erase his/her personal data, cease further dissemination of the data, and potentially have third parties halt processing of the data. The conditions for erasure, as outlined in article 17, include the data no longer being relevant to original purposes for processing, or a data subjects withdrawing consent. It should also be noted that this right requires controllers to compare the subjects' rights to "the public interest in the availability of the data" when considering such requests.

Thanks for reading our Privacy Policy. Any future changes or updates to our privacy policy will be published on this page.

 

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